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    • AWA Composites develops forged carbon composite (forged carbon fiber) connecting rods good for 12,000+ horsepower

      Everyone is familiar with carbon fiber. In the automotive world, it is associated with strong and lightweight parts. Not to mention, it looks cool. Forged carbon is a newer carbon fiber process that differs in how it is made.


      Here is the difference:

      Rather than laying up woven carbon fiber sheets and impregnating it with resin which is your typical carbon fiber manufacturing, Forged Composite uses a paste of fibers or chopped fibers (500,000 turbostratic fibers per square inch) mixed with a resin that is squeezed out to make almost any shape. It can also be put into a compression mold. Since the fibers aren't oriented in any particular direction, the finished part is strong all around, while remaining light.
      AWA Composites showed off carbon fiber connecting rods back in 2018. It seems their process evolved and now their rods are made using forged carbon.

      Quote Originally Posted by AWA Composites
      The unparalleled strength provided by the unimpeded discontinuous and unidirectional fiber reinforcement results in unique benefits that are made available only in our components. AWA has yet another patented process which seals and mitigates the inherent problem of “fluid uptake,” (hygroscopic) which as we know, would be the end of any laminate product. Each connecting rod is custom made to order specifically for the customer/builder. ATA Engineering (independent aerospace engineering firm) concluded that, *“Analytical bearing pressure for a engine up to 4000 horsepower is substantially improved with AWA’s composite connecting rod, so there is less concern about any adverse effect on bearings when switching from an aluminum rod to AWA’s composite connecting rod.” The aforementioned was referencing our “gen 1 composite rod.” Our new gen 2 rod is substantially improved in design, fiber charge pattern and composition. AWA Forged Composite connecting rod is engineered to allow for the wrist pin to run directly on the surface of the rod, therefore eliminating the need for bronze bushings. Our fuel rod is about 640 grams, approximately half of the weight of a comparable aluminum connecting rod. Utilizing our 7.106 composite rods and 1.155 x 3.300 wrist pins allows engine builders to remove a whopping 19.1 lbs of rotating mass over the incumbents! The lead time is approximately 30 days from the placement of order unless otherwise noted. Our material has certain size limitations, all applications are custom ordered.
      So, this is their second generation rod. As previously stated, composite rods have numerous advantages. They are lighter, stronger, and do not fatigue in the same was as metal.

      Aluminum rods have been the first choice in unrestricted classes for decades, from top fuel to the fast sportsman eliminators. Aluminum is lightweight, easily machined, and serves as a shock absorber to cushion loads on the crankshaft. Its downsides are also well documented- aluminum has a shorter fatigue life than steel and requires larger cross sections to achieve comparable strength. If a customer wants to make 400 runs between engine rebuilds, I’ll steer him away from aluminum rods.

      The reality is that an engine with less rotating mass will accelerate faster, which tips the scale in favor of the lightest rods in these applications.
      How much do these rods cost? Good question. Their first gen rods went for $18k a set. Who is running these rods? Another good question. The internal combustion motor is still going to improve in efficiency and composite parts are going to play a large role in the future.

      When do we actually get to see practical performance applications for street cars though?




      This article was originally published in forum thread: AWA Composites develops forged carbon composite (forged carbon fiber) connecting rods good for 12,000+ horsepower started by Sticky View original post
      Comments 13 Comments
      1. vrsixxxxxx's Avatar
        vrsixxxxxx -
        what allocation is this for
      1. threetirtyfive's Avatar
        threetirtyfive -
        640gram? Pah, my fcp forged steel rods weigh in at 617grams.
      1. Sticky2's Avatar
        Sticky2 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by threetirtyfive Click here to enlarge
        640gram? Pah, my fcp forged steel rods weigh in at 617grams.
        Will they hold 12,000 hp?
      1. Sticky2's Avatar
        Sticky2 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by vrsixxxxxx Click here to enlarge
        what allocation is this for
        Custom
      1. threetirtyfive's Avatar
        threetirtyfive -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky2 Click here to enlarge
        Will they hold 12,000 hp?
        To be able to quote a bhp figure they would have to have tested to that power instead of it being theoretical. Which we both know is bull$#@!.
      1. Blown6's Avatar
        Blown6 -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by threetirtyfive Click here to enlarge
        To be able to quote a bhp figure they would have to have tested to that power instead of it being theoretical. Which we both know is bull$#@!.
        Well all know anyone who is serious about advertising the strength of an internal engine component will use “TORQUE” as a measure ...
      1. Payam@BMS's Avatar
        Payam@BMS -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Blown6 Click here to enlarge
        Well all know anyone who is serious about advertising the strength of an internal engine component will use “TORQUE” as a measure ...
        Agreed.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by threetirtyfive Click here to enlarge
        To be able to quote a bhp figure they would have to have tested to that power instead of it being theoretical. Which we both know is bull$#@!.
        Probably but the question is will these rods at the same weight be stronger than your rods? Most likely, yes. They also won't fatigue.
      1. F87Source's Avatar
        F87Source -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        They also won't fatigue.
        This. I'm so tired of having forged motors that last about 80,000 km before rock knock or piston slap because the thermal expansion messes up the metal over time.
      1. subaru335i's Avatar
        subaru335i -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Sticky Click here to enlarge
        Probably but the question is will these rods at the same weight be stronger than your rods? Most likely, yes. They also won't fatigue.
        To be fair, steel rods also don't fatigue.

        You are thinking of aluminum rods which would be most apples to apples to these forged composite. And in that case these would be much better than aluminum rods while also taking monster power.
      1. maxnix's Avatar
        maxnix -
        Damn! I am returning my forged titanium rods now.
      1. Sticky's Avatar
        Sticky -
        Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by subaru335i Click here to enlarge
        To be fair, steel rods also don't fatigue.
        They don't fatigue like aluminum but metal by its very nature has to endure some kind of fatigue.
      1. Snertz's Avatar
        Snertz -
        Cool stuff. If these are truly good for 12k hp, wonder how light they can be made for a modest 1.2k hp.

        At least these are more realistic than the 3D printed BS Extremetooners put out a few months back.